34 [2 1 1 2 ] [0 0 0 0 ]  16 *

UR        9  9  4  * RUČRČU'RČU'RČUČR
URL,UL    11 11 3  & RU'L'UR' {U as U'L-L'UČ} LUL'UL
This is taken from the list of algorithms for orienting corners and edges when they have not been positionned yet. Let's explain what it means. The numbers between [ ] are a description of the position. The order is always : permutation of corners, orientation of corners, permutation of edges, orientation of edges. Here, the permutations of edges and corners are free so I don't write them.

The corners and edges are numbered that way :

 --------
|1  2  2 |
|        |
|1     3 |
|        |
|0  0  3 |
 --------
To show the orientation that I have chosen, I'm giving the position corresponding to [2 1 1 2 ] [0 0 0 0 ] :
        -- 
  --------
||1  2  2 |
 |        |
 |1     3 |
 |        |
||0  0  3 |
  --------
        --
As for the permutations, [1 2 0 3] means that in 0 we have the corner number 1, in 1 we have the corner number 2 and so on. The algorithms below solve that position (they don't reach it when we begin in the solve state).

The integer 16 is the number of symetries of the position. If a position has many symetries, then it has a low probability to appear. The star that follows indicates that at least one of the symetries involves inversing the position. In that case, all the sequences below could be inversed to get other (well, if they are not their own inverses...) sequences that solve the position.

For each sequence, we first have the faces it uses, and then 3 numbers : its length in standard metric, its length in the slice metric (length of RL',RČLČ... is 1) and the maximum distance, when we do the algorithm, to a state where the first 2 layers would be solved. Next there can appear "*", "&" or nothing. A "*" means the sequence is its own inverse. A "&" can only appear when the inverse of the position is not defined (here it is the case : how can we inverse the orientation of corners or edges if we don't know where they are ?), and it means that the inverse of the sequence solves the same position ; so it might be interesting to look at this inverse.

Next comes the sequence itself. If, when we do it, we come 3 (or less) moves close to a state where the first 2 layers would be solved, then I decompose the sequence at that place. For instance, RU'L'UR' {U as U'L-L'UČ} LUL'UL means that the sequence we do is RU'L'UR'-U-LUL'UL and that it is equivalent to RU'L'UR'-U'L-L'UČ-LUL'UL. Alternatively, RUČR'U'R (U'R'-RU) BU'B'R' - BLUL'U'B' means that the sequence we do is RUČR'U'R-BU'B'R'-BLUL'U'B' and that it is equivalent to RUČR'U'R-U'R'-RU-BU'B'R'-BLUL'U'B'.

Two more things that might surprise you in my notations. First the indicator Slices UR : it is given to a sequence if it has particularly many slice moves in the same plane (here the plane UR). I added this special case because I thought the selection program didn't give those sequence enough consideration. Secondly, you might wonder why, for instance, the sequence <<FB'RČF'B>>R'UČRČUČRČUČR' is marked as an UR sequence. Well, it's my choice. If it is better, then I consider that the moves FB'RČF'B only use the faces U and R.